Classified

Place a Classified in The Bulletin Weekly

Plastics Are Strangling the Planet By Bill Fletcher, Jr.
6/27/2019 10:24:41 AM

On my morning walk I pass a tree every day that has a long plastic bag stuck in the branches. I keep wondering whether my neighbor realizes that the bag is strangling the tree. I am not exaggerating. The plastic is not simply sitting on the branches but is cutting off air to the tree. Over time, that branch could die. Think about that the next time you are driving and see plastic bags flying around landing on bushes and trees. This is not a neutral issue. I thought, again, about this matter of plastics when I read a fascinating piece in the Guardian concerning the global glut of plastics...

A Tale of Two Graduations By Julianne Malveaux
6/27/2019 10:22:17 AM

I love graduations! I thoroughly enjoy the sense of achievement and possibility that permeates the air. Graduations signify an ending, but the term "commencement" is used to signify beginnings since they are not only an opportunity to mark completion, but also to mark the beginning of a new chapter of life. In some ways, commencements, regardless of the college or university, with the pomp and circumstance, the ritual robes, the rousing speeches, the tearful families. The two commencements I attended during this graduation season shared those characteristics, but in many ways, they...

$200M in Restitution and Forgiveness Delivers Financial Justice: Settlements Help Consumers Harmed by For-Profit Colleges, High-Cost Loans By Charlene Crowell
6/27/2019 10:20:08 AM

The struggle to eliminate high-cost predatory debt is a daunting one—particularly for Black America. As access to affordable credit, loans and mortgages seem ever elusive across the country, lying in wait are countless predatory lenders eager to fill the personal finance void. But in recent days, two unrelated developments awarded consumers more than $200 million in victories against high-cost private student loans and restitution for triple-digit interest payday loans. Together, the two developments illustrate how freedom from debt burdens can lifted and erased. The work of 44...

On Juneteenth, We Must Remember our Fight for Freedom Continues By Derrick Johnson
6/27/2019 10:17:55 AM

On June 19, 1865, Texan slaves found out they were freed by the Emancipation Proclamation, two and a half years after it was issued by President Abraham Lincoln. Since then, annual celebrations of the emancipation have been referred to as Juneteenth, commemorating the end of slavery in the United States and honoring African American freedom and liberation. As we have for years, we celebrate Juneteenth through food, prayer and festivities honoring a rich tradition that continues to promote education and self-improvement. We’ve seen this holiday take root within communities and...

Children, Teens Face Significant Pressures That Could Affect Mental Health
6/12/2019 5:00:58 PM

Understanding early signs and a willingness to listen are keys to successful treatment By Staff Reports   PASADENA—When it comes to today’s youth, many are overwhelmed with social, school, athletic and cultural pressures. However, too much stress and worrying can be problematic for children and teens. That’s especially true when anxiety starts to get in the way of everyday life, and begins to affect a child’s mental health. Anabel Basulto, a licensed marriage and family therapist with Kaiser Permanente Southern California, says while progress has been...

Perk Up: California Says Coffee Cancer Risk Insignificant
6/12/2019 4:49:50 PM

By Brian Melley LOS ANGELES (AP)—California officially gave its blessing to coffee Monday, declaring the beverage does not pose a “significant” cancer risk. The rule, proposed a year ago by regulators, means coffee won't have to carry ominous warnings that the beverage may be bad for you. The state took the rare move after a Los Angeles judge found Starbucks Corp. and other companies failed to show that benefits from drinking coffee outweighed risks from a byproduct of the roasting process. That ruling put the industry in jeopardy of hefty civil penalties and...

‘Black’ or ‘African American?’
6/7/2019 10:40:00 PM

By Stacy M. Brown   In a recent televised commentary, Dr. Greg Carr, chair of Howard University’s Department of Afro-American Studies kick-started a stirring conversation that has mostly taken place inside the confines of Black communities around the country. Carr tackled the sometimes-uncomfortable topic of identifying as Black versus African-American. “Despite the dictionary definitions, there is no term that truly describes people that were taken from Africa and forced into slavery,” Carr said during commentary on Washington, D.C.’s WUSA. NNPA...

47 State Attorneys General Tell Secretary DeVos to Follow the Law: Forgive Disabled Vets Student Loans
6/7/2019 10:38:56 PM

By Charlene Crowell   Although Memorial Day is considered by many civilians as the unofficial start of summer, the true intent of the holiday is to annually honor those who lost their lives fighting for our country. The men and women who wear or have worn this nation’s uniform in military service across wars and generations are deserving of remembrance as well as appreciation. This honor is particularly poignant for those who lost their lives in the fights for freedom, and others who returned home with permanent disabilities due to their service. But this year on May...

Staying Vigilant on Brown
6/7/2019 10:36:51 PM

By Marian Wright Edelman   As a teenager, many of Barbara Johns’ wildest dreams were about a surprising subject: a new school. “My imagination would run rampant—and I would dream that some mighty man of great wealth built us a new school building or that our parents got together and surprised us with this grand new building and we had a big celebration—I even imagined that a great storm came through and blew down the main building and splattered the shacks to splinters …” Then a day came when 16-year-old Barbara decided to put her dreams into...

IN MEMORIAM: Leah Chase, Legendary ‘Queen of Creole Cuisine’ and Civil Rights Icon Dies at 96
6/7/2019 10:25:08 PM

By Stacy M. Brown   Known as the “Queen of Creole Cuisine,” Leah Chase carved out quite the niche in and around New Orleans for more than six decades. During that time, she fed individuals like Quincy Jones, Jesse Jackson, Duke Ellington, Thurgood Marshall, James Baldwin, Ray Charles, Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama and countless others as Executive Chef of Dooky Chase’s Restaurant—one of the best-known and most culturally significant restaurants in New Orleans. “If your soul is in New Orleans, I know what to give you,” Chase...