I Will Vote! Choosing NOT to Vote Still Impacts You
10/31/2018 10:01:07 PM

By Jeffrey L. Boney   “I Will Vote!” That is such an empowering statement, when you think about it, especially considering how important voting is for Black people at this critical time in this country. The voting rights of Blacks are being targeted and threatened every day and those threats have become extremely rampant over the course of the last several months leading up to these important midterm elections in a few weeks. Early voting has begun in several states and the shenanigans have also increased. There have been a number of reports coming out across...

Over 53 Million Consumers Unbanked or Underbanked
10/31/2018 9:59:18 PM

By Charlene Crowell One of the most reliable measures of a community’s economic vitality is convenient access to full-service banking. Regardless of whether a community is urban, suburban or rural, both consumers and local businesses rely on brick and mortar bank branches for a wide array of products and services. New research that measures how well banks serve communities found that America’s access to banking expanded from 2015 to 2017 – except when it comes to more than 53 million Black and Latino consumers or others with low incomes or less education. In...

Lessons from Ruby Bridges
10/31/2018 9:58:19 PM

By Marian Wright Edelman I recently had the joy of presenting an award from the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs to Ruby Bridges. As a six-year-old first grader in New Orleans in 1960, Ruby Bridges became the first Black student to attend an all-White elementary school in the South. She showed unforgettable loving forgiveness and courage when faced with ugly screaming White mobs who jeered and taunted her every day as she walked into William Frantz Elementary School. Federal marshals had to escort Ruby to school every day, but she never quit or turned...

Politically Correct, or Perfectly Civil
10/31/2018 9:57:08 PM

By Julianne Malveaux Megyn Kelly is off the air at NBC. After her horridly vapid statement saying she didn't see anything wrong with blackface, she apologized the next day and even invited journalist Roland Martin on to take her to school. Roland did a brilliant job in explaining the history of blackface and the way it demeans African American people, and it was great that he had the opportunity to educate, not only his odious host but also the millions who watch Megyn Kelly daily. So, Kelly tearfully apologized, and she listened to Roland and television commentator Amy Holmes as they...

Is There Interference in the 2018 U.S. Midterm Elections?
10/24/2018 4:07:24 PM

By Michael Balsamo   WASHINGTON (AP)—When the Justice Department unsealed criminal charges detailing a yearslong effort by a Russian troll farm to “sow division and discord in the U.S. political system,” it was the first federal case alleging continued foreign interference in U.S. elections. Earlier Friday, American intelligence officials released a rare public statement asserting that Russia, China, Iran and other countries are engaged in ongoing efforts to influence U.S. policy and voters in future elections. The statement didn't provide details on...

L.A. County Looks to Expand Jail Diversion Program
10/24/2018 4:05:38 PM

LOS ANGELES—A pilot program aimed at getting homeless people who commit low-level crimes into treatment or housing rather than jail cells is likely to be expanded, based on a vote Tuesday by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. Supervisor Sheila Kuehl said 42 of the 109 people enrolled in the pilot have since moved into in-patient substance abuse treatment programs or bridge or permanent housing. About 80 percent of those enrolled were homeless when they entered the law-enforcement assisted diversion or LEAD program. "The county's LEAD pilot program has...

Done to Us Not with Us: Calling for New Voices
10/24/2018 4:01:45 PM

By Khalilah Long, Communications Manager, UNCF   Parents play critical roles in their child’s achievement from kindergarten through high school graduation. Parent advocacy has proven to have positive implications on student educational success. But who advocates for and supports parents and caregivers? In African American households, oftentimes, clergy or other prominent community leaders are the galvanizing force behind motivating community involvement. In the ‘50s and ’60s, during the Civil Rights Movement, critical voices for change came through influential...

Academic Standards and the Every Student Succeeds Act
10/24/2018 4:00:09 PM

By: Dr. Elizabeth Primas   The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines standards as, “something established by authority, custom, or general consent as a model or example. For example,” the Egyptians established the 365-day calendar, recording 4236 BC as the first year in recorded history. Around 1100 AD in England, it was determined that the length of King Henry Beauclerc’s foot would be used for the standard measurement of a linear foot. These standards of time and linear measurement are still widely used and accepted today. During the Civil War, America...

The Land of the Free
10/24/2018 3:58:35 PM

This week marked the fiftieth anniversary of the Black Power salute given by Olympic medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos as the American anthem played during their medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympic Games. Their quiet nonviolent protest earned them loud and widespread criticism, death threats and suspension from the U.S track team. Tommie Smith later said: “We were just human beings who saw a need to bring attention to the inequality in our country . . . I don’t like the idea of people looking at it as negative. There was nothing but a raised fist in the air and a bowed head,...

School Grading Practices Are Inaccurate and Inequitable to Impacted Children
10/24/2018 3:56:10 PM

By Joe Feldman   The battle for equity in our schools is not only a fight to guarantee access to great teaching and high-quality learning environments, programs, and materials. The battle for equity also includes the practices and policies that teachers use to describe students’ success or failure in school. An issue often overlooked, grading, is of critical importance. Grades determine so many decisions made about our children: whether they are promoted, qualify to play on the athletic field, graduate, receive scholarships, and get accepted to college. Unfortunately, in too...