It’s as If the GOP Is Trying to Lose Control of Congress
4/19/2018 10:05:11 PM

By Robert Romano House Speaker Paul Ryan is not running for reelection in 2018, but apparently intends to serve out his term as House Speaker. That brings the wave of House Republicans retiring or running for different offices this cycle up to 40. That, after the $1.3 trillion stinker of an omnibus spending bill, where Democrat priorities like the New York-New Jersey Gateway tunnel were included with an extra $380 million, Planned Parenthood continues to get $500 million a year via Medicaid and other government health programs, but President Donald Trump’s priorities like building...

Go Vote! Somebody Paid the Price!
4/19/2018 7:51:49 PM

By Jeffrey L. Boney All you have to do is crack open a history book, or sit with one of our experienced elders, and you will learn about the many sacrifices made by people of all races in order to ensure Black people obtained the uninhibited right to vote. No other group of people in America have benefited more from the sacrifices made by so many people who fought, bled and died fighting for our freedom and the right to vote, as Black people have. The freedom Black Americans experience today came with a significant price tag attached to it, and that freedom has definitely not been...

Is China Good or Bad for Our Mother Africa?
4/19/2018 7:49:24 PM

By Harry C. Alford This question has been the subject for concerned American Blacks at least a million times. Whenever one of us travels to the African Continent the subject of questionable activity by the nation of China comes into play. After a dozen or so trips to any part of the continent (Ghana to Botswana to Kenya to Equatorial Guinea and so on and on) the shock of seeing Chinese workers and construction sites with Chinese writing on the billboards can turn a Black person’s face into a mean scowl. Much of this blame is the fault of American policy versus that of China. The...

Child Opportunity and Stability Starts at Home
4/19/2018 7:44:30 PM

By Marian Wright Edelman Fifty years ago this week the Civil Rights Act of 1968, also known as the Fair Housing Act, became law after passing Congress in the wake of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s assassination. The Fair Housing Act prohibited discrimination in the sale, rental and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin, or sex. It followed up the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 by addressing the persistent and pervasive housing inequality undergirded by federal policy that threatened to derail other efforts towards a more integrated and equal society. As he...

Payday Lenders Wage New Wars Against Consumers and Regulation
4/19/2018 7:28:39 PM

Nearly seven years ago, Congress fought for and won enactment of reforms that would help ensure that everyone would play by the same financial rules. The promise to the nation was that the days of ignoring the long-term health of the national economy as an excuse to justify lucrative and short-term profits would be over. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act gave guardrails to lenders and consumers alike. Charged to keep that vow was the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Serving as the nation’s financial cop-on-the-beat, CFPB worked to bring fairness and balance to the...

Getting Kids to a Good Weight by 13 May Help Avoid Diabetes
4/12/2018 1:05:08 PM

By Marilynn Marchione There may be a critical window for overweight kids to get to a healthy level. Those who shed their extra pounds by age 13 had the same risk of developing diabetes in adulthood as others who had never weighed too much, a large study of Danish men found. Diabetes can develop when the body can't properly use insulin to turn food into energy. Being overweight at any age raises the chances of the most common form, Type 2. But it's not known whether or how much that risk is reduced if people lose weight, and when. “This study seems to suggest that...

Healthcare practitioners need to ensure beneficence, justice, and respect for all.
4/12/2018 1:01:29 PM

Study: Blacks and Whites Differ in Their Willingness to Participate in Health Research Studies Racial and ethnic minorities, especially Africa-Americans are significantly less likely to participate in health-related research than whites, says a new study from Ball State University. This impedes the testing, development, implementation, and evaluation of various clinical and community based disease prevention and health promotion interventions, said said Jagdish Khubchandani, a community health education professor in Ball State's College of Health and author of the study...

For Many Black Washingtonians, Gentrification Threatens Housing and Health
4/12/2018 1:00:01 PM

By Barrington M. Salmon This is the first article in a series focused on the health effects associated with gentrification in Washington, D.C. This series is supported through a journalism fellowship with the Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School of Journalism at the University of Southern California. By many measures, the revitalization of neighborhoods across Washington, D.C. has been a windfall for the city. Fueled by higher tax revenues and property values, the city is awash in construction cranes, new libraries, restaurants and retail, and more than 70 miles of bike...

Remembering Dr. King
4/12/2018 12:56:33 PM

By Marian Wright Edelman I first heard Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speak in person on April 19, 1960 at Spelman College’s Sisters Chapel during my senior year in college. Dr. King was just 31 but he had already gained a national reputation during the successful Montgomery Bus Boycott five years earlier. The profound impact on me of hearing Dr. King that first time is evident in my diary where I repeated long portions of his speech that had vibrated the chords of my freedom- and justice-hungry soul. It is not often that great leaders and great turning points in history converge and...

We Have More in Common Than What Separates Us
4/12/2018 12:53:51 PM

By Sen. Kamala D. Harris The genius of Dr. King was that he was both aspirational and a realist. Last month, in the middle of this incredibly challenging time for our nation, I had the honor of joining Congressman John Lewis for the annual march commemorating the Selma to Montgomery march for voting rights. And as we crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, I thought about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dream. It was 50 years ago that Dr. King’s life was cut short. But his impact lives on today in countless ways. When we think of the doors of opportunity that have swung open to...