Experts: Transparency in education improves parental engagement
12/27/2017 1:13:11 AM

By Stacy M. Brown The public reporting requirements of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) offer greater transparency about school quality, according to experts and education advocates who also predict that the new law will empower parents and make them more informed partners in the education process of their children. President Barack Obama signed ESSA into law on December 10, 2015. “Public reporting is going to be very important, because state systems, like what goes into [calculating] letter grades for schools, are incredibly complex,” said Phillip Lovell, the vice...

National Millennial community works to dispel stereotypes about young people
12/27/2017 1:12:53 AM

Chevrolet recently partnered with the National Millennial Community and sent out groups of influential young people to destinations around Seattle, Washington to execute think tank-style discussions on topics related to the success of today’s multicultural millennials. The National Millennial Community (NMC) is a progressive and diverse group of millennials that works to dispel negative stereotypes about the generation and represents the 80 million young people in this country by conducting think tanks, seminars and engagement opportunities with the CEOs of major corporations. The...

NASA celebrates legacy of first Black American astronaut on anniversary of his death
12/27/2017 1:12:19 AM

By Erick Johnson Fifty years ago, a tragic accident ended the groundbreaking career of Major Robert H. Lawrence, Jr., a Chicago native and stellar Air Force pilot who became America’s first Black astronaut. On December 8, 2017—the 50th anniversary of his death—NASA honored his often-ignored legacy and contributions to the agency. Earlier this year, the Chicago Crusader reported about the lack of visibility of NASA’s first Black American astronaut and helped to raise awareness about Lawrence’s incredible journey. In planning a story for its annual...

Omarosa's departure highlights lack of White House diversity
12/27/2017 1:12:02 AM

By Jill Colvin With Omarosa Manigault Newman's departure, the White House has lost arguably its most prominent and visible African-American senior staffer, serving as a reminder of the lack of diversity at the upper echelons of the Trump administration. Manigault Newman was one of just a handful of African-Americans to hold a senior position under Trump. Ben Carson, the secretary of Housing and Urban Development, is the president's only African-American Cabinet member. Jerome Adams, Trump's surgeon general, is also black. In an interview Thursday with ABC's...

Myrlie Evers' thoughtful speech sets tone for 2 museums
12/27/2017 1:11:46 AM

By Emily Wagster Pettus Myrlie Evers could have been bitter and left Mississippi forever after a white supremacist assassinated her husband, state NAACP leader Medgar Evers, outside the family's Jackson home in 1963. Yet, as the state commemorated its bicentennial, Mrs. Evers gave a thoughtful and inspirational speech to dedicate two museums that tell the complex history of, as she intentionally said, “the state of my birth.” The Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum are two distinct entities under a single roof. They are in downtown...

Summit for black boys and young men teaches ways to succeed
12/27/2017 1:11:20 AM

Hundreds of teens came together in Milwaukee for a summit on the challenges young African-American males face and the paths to personal success. About 600 African-American boys and teenagers attended the two-day Black Male Youth summit at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee earlier this month, Milwaukee Public Radio reported. The students' teachers encouraged them to participate because they are focused on college and careers. The annual summit aims to help African-American males identify challenges they face, such as unemployment, poverty and mass incarceration, and find ways to...

Black women, Democrat Doug Jones win Alabama Senate race Democrat Doug Jones stuns Moore, Trump and the RNC to win Sessions’ senate seat
12/27/2017 1:11:02 AM

By Stacy M. Brown A heavy African American turnout in Alabama’s special election propelled underdog Democratic candidate Doug Jones to victory, in a hotly-contested race against the flawed, yet heavily-favored, Republican candidate Roy Moore. The New York Times reported that Jones defeated Moore 49.9 percent to 48.4 percent for Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ vacated United States Senate seat. According to CNN exit polling, 68 percent of White voters, including 72 percent of White men voters and 63 percent of White women voters, supported Moore, an alleged child...

San Francisco native becomes city's 1st black woman mayor
12/27/2017 1:10:33 AM

By Paul Elias San Francisco native London Breed became the city's acting mayor Tuesday following the sudden death of Mayor Ed Lee, and is the first African-American woman to lead the city in the midst of a seemingly endless technology driven economic boom. Breed, 43, is a lifelong San Francisco resident who was raised by her grandmother in the city's predominantly black and lower-income Western Addition neighborhood, part of the same district she now represents as a city supervisor. She said she and Lee bonded over their shared experience of growing up in public...

In a place that backed Trump, residents weigh racial divides
12/13/2017 9:27:01 PM

By Claire Galfaro In Robeson County, North Carolina, the most diverse rural county in America, many often remark at how well residents have overcome the scars of slavery and segregation to get along. The community once was a manufacturing powerhouse dotted with textile factories that have mostly closed up and moved overseas. Last November, it flipped from voting reliably Democratic in presidential elections and backed Donald Trump.  Now some in the county are divided over racial equality, nationalism and Trump's comments on Muslims and minorities. Many African-Americans in...

San Francisco defends sanctuary status as backlash mounts
12/13/2017 9:26:32 PM

By Paul Elias and Janie Har The attacks on San Francisco and other cities with similar immigration policies began moments after a jury acquitted a Mexican man of killing a woman on a popular pier, some calling for a boycott of the city that fiercely defends its reputation as a refuge for all. President Donald Trump called the verdict a “complete travesty of justice,” and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions demanded cities like San Francisco scrap immigration policies that bar cooperation with federal deportation efforts. Twitter users turned to the hashtags...